April 16, 2012
Yeah.  I am sure they are investigating real hard….
occupyallstreets:

Boston Police Investigating Officer’s For Choking A Gay Protester
Boston Police is investigating its officers’ response to rowdy duel protests at the Boston Common on Sunday, Tax Day, after a photo surfaced showing “a city officer with his hand around a protester’s neck.” As Daily Kos’ Scott Wooledge reports, the Tea Party-organized event was co-sponsored by the vehemently anti-gay MassResistance and featured Scott Lively, “professional worldwide hunter of homosexuals and top proponent of ‘gay cure’” and a proponent of Uganda’s infamous ‘kill gays’ legislation.
As counter-protesters — including Occupy Boston Queer and Trans Direct Action Working Group — expressed their opposition to Lively’s participation, one of the speakers said from the podium, broadcast across the loud speakers at the Commons, “We will not be silenced by faggots.” Read a first-hand account from the protester roughed up in the picture at Back2Stonewall.
Source

Yeah.  I am sure they are investigating real hard….

occupyallstreets:

Boston Police Investigating Officer’s For Choking A Gay Protester

Boston Police is investigating its officers’ response to rowdy duel protests at the Boston Common on Sunday, Tax Day, after a photo surfaced showing “a city officer with his hand around a protester’s neck.” As Daily Kos’ Scott Wooledge reports, the Tea Party-organized event was co-sponsored by the vehemently anti-gay MassResistance and featured Scott Lively, “professional worldwide hunter of homosexuals and top proponent of ‘gay cure’” and a proponent of Uganda’s infamous ‘kill gays’ legislation.

As counter-protesters — including Occupy Boston Queer and Trans Direct Action Working Group — expressed their opposition to Lively’s participation, one of the speakers said from the podium, broadcast across the loud speakers at the Commons, “We will not be silenced by faggots.” Read a first-hand account from the protester roughed up in the picture at Back2Stonewall.

Source

(via anarcho-queer)

December 20, 2010
"

A culture war has broken out at the UN over whether gay people should be offered the same protections as other minorities whose lives are threatened. The issue will come to a head today when the general assembly votes on renewing its routine condemnation of the unjustified killing of various categories of vulnerable people. But because of a change promoted by Arab and African nations and approved at committee level, the resolution drops “sexual orientation” and replaces it with “discriminatory reasons on any basis”. The biennial resolution does not refer to sexual orientation for the first time since 1999. The US ambassador, Susan Rice, said she was “incensed” that the reference was removed, and that the US will attempt to restore it… Britain called it “an affront to human dignity…”

More than two-thirds of UN members, many of them Muslim nations, are refusing to sign a separate UN statement condemning human rights violations based on sexual orientation and gender identity, especially with regard to the application of the death penalty and extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions.

Under the Bush administration in 2008, the US refused to join all other western nations in signing the declaration.

"

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/dec/21/gay-rights-row-un-resolution

October 15, 2010
Some half formed, deeply personal, substance abuse assisted thoughts on Israel

I think the Idea of Israel is amazing. A place in the world where, whatever happens, at least in theory, Jews can feel safe. Whatever people want to say, anti-Semitism is still very alive in the world, not just in places like the Middle East, but at home also. And that is fucked up.

I wish I had a place like that sometimes. I don’t mean to make light of the historical magnitude of violence against Jews, not just the Holocaust but the Inquisition and various pragmatic campaigns accross Europe through the middle ages. Feeling like an unprotected minority sucks. Going to school for education in a state where, surprise, you can’t legally be certified to teach because of your sexuality, sucks. Going to Australia because you think it’ll be better there, and then realizing everywhere has its own problems is sort of a letdown… in the face of which the best option feels like it’s to keep your options open and have job offers and networks and doors open in as many countries as possible, cause you don’t know how long yours will be workable.

But what happens if, instead of getting over all of our differences and hatreds, we all decide that we need our own personal safe place, and we’re willing to use any means necessary to get it?

I am not saying I wouldn’t do it if I thought it were in my interests. I’m a pretty terrible person when it comes to that stuff, mostly because I’m not willing to be the only person on the planet to not be pragmatic. But I don’t think that’s the road to coexistance and progress and sustainable happiness. Even though it’s a road I wish I could go down.

Right. Happy thoughts.

Andrew

P.S. Please people, avoid jumping down my throat on this stuff if I sound anti-semetic or something in this argument. I am not trying to… just throwing out a thought.

July 7, 2010
"

One of the men, known as T, was challenging an appeal court decision that he could return to his native Cameroon even though he had been attacked by a mob after he was seen kissing a male partner.

The other, known as J, had been told (by British authorities) he could be expected to tolerate conditions arising from his homosexual relationship in Iran, his home country. He was advised to behave discreetly to avoid reprisals.

Punishment for homosexual acts ranges from public flogging to execution in Iran. In Cameroon jail sentences for homosexuality range from six months to five years.

"

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2010/jul/07/gay-asylum-seekers-rights-deportation

2:15pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZiWeSykcQQF
Filed under: LGBT Gay rights 
January 27, 2010
A personal update/Gay rights tangent?

Well I suppose I haven’t written a real entry for a while, sorry bout that, chock it up to being back at school, or busy adjusting back to modern life, or whatever you want, but I haven’t been all that good at keeping communication up to date.  I have gotten a lot of good writing done, and am getting into the intensive revision stage with some friends and trusted professors, which is quite exciting.  I’ve also been reading some interesting work by Ernesto Guevara, which I have found absolutely captivating.  A lot of people know about his later life, but the early work is much lighter on theory and much heavier on…. living.  Guevara had a passion for experiencing the world and taking in everything about it that he could, something I can certainly relate to, and the ways in which he struggled to integrate his feelings and observations into his life, as well as into the modern world, is a near perfect reflection of some of my own internal quarrels, despite the fact that he and I have some of the most different politics imaginable.

I am starting to find, a bit disconcertingly, that I’m getting to the position where I am willing to fight for what I see to be “just.”  This sounds a lot deeper than it is, but I’ve just been overwhelmed with the inequities that plague American society, and Western society in general, to this day.  American liberal arts students love to criticize the treatment of women and minorities in other countries, especially Africa and the Middle East, but there are still a number of divides within this country, and, more importantly, they seem to be getting much, much worse.  Twenty years ago it would have been quite unacceptable to have a song about ejaculating in a woman’s face and slapping her around on the radio, or well liked throughout dormitories, but now it’s sort of expected.

The same thing can be said for gay rights.  Unfortunately, I think that, in many ways, the gay rights movement is starting to go the same way that modern feminism has.  Legal oppression is slowly giving way, but as the so called gay “community” (which, most would admit, is most commonly represented by drunk twenty-year-olds in pink thongs dancing around on floats in pride festivals) celebrates these victories, a popular hostility to the gay population appears to be bordering on an increase.  Where I went to high-school, it never really mattered that I was gay.  It made some people uncomfortable, but there was never a significant divide between me and everyone else.  At Arcadia, however, where the tiny but vocal “gay community” is more than sufficiently represented, it seems there is a concrete chasm.  There isn’t any discomfort, there is just disconnect.  People simply say “he’s gay,” or “he’s straight,” and don’t get close to people who aren’t a part of their bubble.

Is this really what people are trying to work towards?

I don’t mean to insult anyone, or say they don’t get to do what they want to.  But I will say this: to behave like a sex crazed, exhibitionist maniac, and then attach the label of “homosexual” to it is hijacking.  It is just as offensive as the writer of the previously mentioned song about sexually dominating women saying he represented Black or Hispanic society.  Never mind that„ at least implicitly, many songwriters do, they don’t outright say “yes we are the black people, and this is what we represent.”  Numerous gay pride groups do.

I am tired of being labeled by these groups, and that’s why I have distanced myself from them.  A lot of people have called me insecure because of this, but I would argue the opposite… that giving up ones identity to some sort of “mass movement” is the very definition of insecurity.

Or do male homosexuals really want to be represented by promiscuity, suntans, anorexia, and hair bleach?

To be sure, these movements have achieved a great deal, most notably in publicizing the issue of same-sex marriage.  But in over half of this country, it is illegal for homosexuals to be certified as educators, including in Pennsylvania.  I have only met one so called “gay activist” on campus who was even remotely aware of this, and that is because she was an educator.

If the so called gay community wants to define itself based upon some image, why can’t it be rationality, reason, and a just struggle, instead of excess, promiscuity, and an image which mainstream society finds distinctly difficult to stomach?

I apologize if this rant offends anyone, but these are questions which have seemed incredibly obvious to me for years, and I feel inclined to broadcast it in some sort of public forum, being that in class it would certainly offend someone beyond the point of academic acceptability.

Andrew

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