April 17, 2014
woodendreams:

(by harrynavy)

woodendreams:

(by harrynavy)

April 10, 2014
woodendreams:

(by Derek Kind)

woodendreams:

(by Derek Kind)

February 12, 2014
woodendreams:

(by Evgeni Dinev)

woodendreams:

(by Evgeni Dinev)

(via americanwanderlust)

February 9, 2014
cornersoftheworld:

Northern Ireland | By Pawel Klarecki

cornersoftheworld:

Northern Ireland | By Pawel Klarecki

February 7, 2014
cornersoftheworld:

Huangshan, China | By  Artem Verkhoglyad

cornersoftheworld:

Huangshan, China | By Artem Verkhoglyad

February 4, 2014
woodendreams:

(by coulombic)

woodendreams:

(by coulombic)

January 27, 2014
woodendreams:

(by katepedley)

woodendreams:

(by katepedley)

January 26, 2014
woodendreams:

(by Doug Solis)

woodendreams:

(by Doug Solis)

January 21, 2014
What Vaccine Refusal Really Costs: Measles in Arizona - Wired Science

I’m a living testament to the fact that having a virus that has no cure is horrible.  Measles vaccine is over 99% effective.  STOP BEING IRRATIONAL FUCKSHITS, anti-vaccine people!!!!

robot-heart-politics:

In February 2008, a 37-year-old Swiss woman who had never been vaccinated against measles arrived in Tucson after a visit to Mexico. She developed breathing problems and a rash and went to a local hospital’s emergency room. They suspected she had a viral illness and admitted her.

Here’s what you have to know, to understand what happened next. Measles is extremely contagious; up to 90 percent of unvaccinated people who are exposed to it will get it. And if someone nearby has it, you will get exposed — because coughed-out measles virus can travel across a room, and hangs in the air for hours. The best protection against spreading measles in a hospital is putting someone in a negative-pressure isolation room, which is engineered so no air can leak out into the rest of the hospital. It took two days to get the Swiss tourist into isolation, because measles is rare enough in the US that it was not the hospital personnel’s first thought.

Meanwhile:

A 50-year-old woman who had spent an hour in the ER at the same time as the Swiss woman caught the disease from her. Patient 2 got taken care of, went home, and started feeling feverish nine days later. She had difficulty breathing and thought at first she was having an asthma attack, so she went back to the hospital and was admitted for two days. That she had measles would not be discovered until six days after that.

While she was  in the hospital, Patient 2 unknowingly infected a 41-year-old health care worker who took care of her — and who was scheduled to get a measles-vaccine booster shot that very day, because the hospital was also caring for the tourist. Patient 2 also passed measles to an unvaccinated 11-month-old boy who was in the same ER while she was waiting to get checked for asthma, and to two unvaccinated siblings — 3 and 5 years old — who were visiting their mother on the same hospital floor after Patient 2 was admitted.

Patient 3, the health-care worker, passed measles to a 47-year-old woman in her emergency department — who later  ended up in an intensive care unit with measles pneumonia — and later to a 41-year-old man in his home. Patient 4, the toddler, gave the virus to an unvaccinated 1-year-old while they were both in the same pediatrician’s office. Five other people were infected somewhere in their everyday lives: a 2-year-old boy who had never been vaccinated and who also ended up in an ICU with seizures brought on by high fever; a 9-month-old and an 8-month-old, also unvaccinated; and two adults, 35 and 37, who might have gotten one dose as children, but had no documentation of receiving a second dose.

Those 14 are just the confirmed cases. In addition to them, there were 363 suspected ones, and today’s paper makes clear authorities believe there were more illnesses than they know.

My daughter’s previous pediatrician told us that one person with measles in their waiting room not only could infect practically everyone else in the waiting room at the same time as the child if they were not vaccinated, but could also infect everyone who came into the waiting room for up to 13 hours after the child left. It’s extremely contagious and does not require direct contact. Just being in the same room as someone who was sick several hours after they are left is enough to get sick. And serious complications are not that uncommon.

So while anti-vaxxers are refusing to vaccinate their kids because of a side effect—seizures brought on by high fever—of the vaccine that is extremely rare, they put their kid, and any other unvaccinated kid, at risk of having the exact same complications from an actual illness where that complication is much more common…plus a ton more complications.

Vaccinate your kids. Vaccinate yourself.

(via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

January 19, 2014
cornersoftheworld:

Venus and the Milky Way along a wild beach in Point Reyes, California
taken by Don Dianda (dondianda.tumblr.com)

cornersoftheworld:

Venus and the Milky Way along a wild beach in Point Reyes, California

taken by Don Dianda (dondianda.tumblr.com)

Liked posts on Tumblr: More liked posts »